Posts tagged " restorative path "

REZVETS

August 18th, 2016 Posted by Organizations, Resources No Comment yet

RezVets is a Veterans outreach and educational organization designed to positively impact military members and their families and friends. Its mission is to help restore, reconcile and re-integrate veterans and their families to a holistic relationship within family and community including the community of faith.

Richmond Times Dispatch – In rural Loudoun, a refuge for combat vets and their families

August 17th, 2016 Posted by Articles, Resources No Comment yet

The Richmond Times Dispatch highlights Boulder Crest Retreat, the nation’s first privately-funded rural wellness center dedicated exclusively to our nation’s combat veterans and their families.

Boulder Crest Retreat

December 9th, 2015 Posted by Organizations, Resources No Comment yet

Boulder Crest Retreat is the nation’s first privately-funded rural wellness center dedicated exclusively to our nation’s combat veterans and their families. We are committed to improving the physical, emotional, spiritual and economic wellbeing of this remarkable community of heroes, and ensuring they have the opportunity to succeed in their new mission – a life of passion, purpose and service – here at home.

FOX News Health: US veterans find combat-related stress relief in holistic-medicine retreat

December 9th, 2015 Posted by Articles, Resources No Comment yet

Ever since 47-year-old Andy Kaufmann retired from the U.S. Army in 2009, scenes from active duty in Iraq, Bosnia, and the Saudi Arabia and Kuwait border have rattled his body and mind— giving him hyper-vigilance, disrupting his sleep and memory function, and threatening his marriage of 21 years.

Soul Care: Spiritual Journey Toward Healing and Well-being for Our Veterans and their Families

November 10th, 2015 Posted by Blog No Comment yet

The church is uniquely positioned to give attention to the spiritual health of our veterans – an underserved component of veteran’s well-being. Churches have distinctive strengths and capacities for care. The church is the sacred community called forth for life and healing.

“Formed by War” and Shaped by Faith

June 16th, 2015 Posted by Blog 2 comments

Yes, warriors can be formed by war. But, so can the warrior be shaped by faith. The faith community can get “a better understanding of war’s assault on the human soul” and be active in veteran healing and reconciliation. Combat wounds the soul, but the gospel offers hope!

Formed by War

June 16th, 2015 Posted by Articles No Comment yet

Image: Jo Hanley

The cover story for 15 June 2015 Christianity Today, Formed by War,  Annalaura Montgomery Chuang writes,

“While war is everywhere in human history, a clear sign that we live in a fallen world, only relatively recently have we begun to study the psychological trauma it can cause. Now, thanks to new research on combat trauma, veterans – and the church – are getting a better understanding of war’s assault on the human soul.”

Combat wounds the soul, but the gospel offers hope. Click here to read the entire article on Christianity Today website.

Soul Care Conversation

June 16th, 2015 Posted by Blog 2 comments

What do you desire to share, ponder, process, and pursue? I would hope that we can begin to assess the unique strengths and capacities we have for care; map the assets we have as faith communities or faith partners; and explore, engage and equip leaders and concerned congregations to the specific needs within the veteran and caregiver community. So, let us begin the conversation…

Military and Veteran Caregiver Network

June 14th, 2015 Posted by Organizations, Resources No Comment yet

The Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network (MVCN) offers peer-based support and services to connect caregivers with others who are giving care to members of the military or veterans who are living with wounds, illness or injury.

Monday-Morning Quarterback, Hindsight Prompts the Question: Is That How Good People Act?

May 19th, 2015 Posted by Blog No Comment yet

Here I would disagree with Taub and Horton. Not only does society have a responsibility but it has the resources for “burden sharing.” The faith community has unique strengths and capacities to share the moral burdens of war by providing a social support, established spiritual traditions of prayer and meditation, and the practice of rituals stemming from a rich history of healing, forgiveness, repentance, and reconciliation.